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  #61  
Old 10-21-2007, 05:41 AM
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Well I have not lead a guild/clan since 2000 when I went to college and resigned leadership of my old clan which died soon thereafter so I cannot speak of modern Guild loyalty. However, here is what I can remember from days of old.

A guild needs to start with a core group of gamers. This is key because if you support and help one another and the new members of the clan then the new members will start helping out also. Furthermore, this CORE group of players makes it so that the clan does not die. Either by internal forces or just by leaving. Rules Are also key because if people are getting booted for breaking rules then you get more loyal members because they will have respect for you for being Hard but Fair.

Now Mind you I lead RTS and RPG games mainly and there were times people would leave the guild but usually they would come back either due the the new guild they were apart of falling apart or not giving then what they needed.

Most guilds typically last less then 6 months or less. In the new world of MMOs like WOW I cannot say for sure. I am a professional now in my field and still love to play games. It seems to me our "generation" of gamers has the loyality due to work ethic and as these other gamers "grow up" the loyality will come if they stop looking out only for #1.

I am sure I have more to say on the matter but I am very tired so I am signing off for now before I get in trouble with the misses.
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  #62  
Old 10-21-2007, 06:08 PM
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Im a guild leader in GW and I have lots of trouble to about keping members, I have tries many things. and sadly every 20 members recruited 2 stay longer than two months, I think its cause since these guilds are a volunteer organizezation, there is nothing to stop new guild members from leaving when they want to, thats wat new MMORPGs need is a incentive to be loyal to a guild.
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  #63  
Old 10-23-2007, 10:06 PM
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I think Mutt summed up my views quite nicely here:

Quote:
1) Guild identity that transcends the games. Give your players something to identify with that doesnt include being all night elves in WoW, etc. Core ideals, future desires, friendships. These are all important.
I think part of the key is that the original MMOs were social games. Now a lot of MMOs are simply games with the social aspect served as a side dish, and sometimes not at all. However, the loyal-to-their-guild type of gamers are still out there. They're just harder to find.

Which brings me to Mutt's post. There's a lot of good ideas here to find these loyalists, or for them to find you - keeping an open recruiting policy and just weed out those who don't fit, or advertising on forums, etc. However I think simply a "good idea" and originality, character, identity as key qualities to your guild are all far more important.

Why? Because there are tons of guilds out there now. Why join yours out of all the others? This is where the idenity comes into play. Create a set theme to your guild, something that players can identify with, and stick with it. Be it a strict roleplay guild, or a competative, serious PvP guild. An easy way to do this is just to take your core group of your guild, make a list of your gaming values, what you hope to accomplish, etc, and that's your guilds idenity. If your core group all want to be in your guild for these listed reasons, then there's likely other gamers out there just like them who would join as well.

In short, stand out and be original. I think something like that would draw a loyalist to join your guild above the others every time.
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  #64  
Old 10-23-2007, 11:25 PM
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No, guild loyalty is not a thing of the past. I've been a loyal player within member guilds of the United Legit Gaming Guilds alliance for over a decade.

The key for me was a warm, welcoming environment. The leaders of the guilds I've worked with stress an environment that feels more like a band of brothers than a squad of self-serving, egomaniacal freelancers.

Catering to a certain type of player may seem like suicide, but if you can garner a certain reputation, you won't have to seek recruits for much longer. A successful enterprise is something people want to be a part of, one way or another.

I know it sounds elitist, but it works.
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  #65  
Old 10-27-2007, 02:16 AM
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I completely agree with Madrakaetrus - I belong to the ULGG forum site although not a member of the guild, and on looking around, there are so many things I see which foster comraderie and fellowship - things which really are not that difficult to bring into your own guild if you want a really good core group of people who will not just be loyal to you if you are a guild leader, such as myself, but also to each *other*.
Our guild (Kindred Knights of the Phoenix) has been going strong for 2 years now, and have had really about 5 people leave over the course of those 2 years. Two left for personal reasons, one left because he gave his second account to a friend, and one left for reasons unknown - then one other left recently because a friend of his asked if he would keep an eye on her guild while she was away for an extended period of time. We have had little to no "drama", do not participate in "mass recruiting" in major towns, and really take the time to get to know potential members through an application, running with them a time or two, and then welcoming them into our group.
Essentially, you are talking about truly fostering friendship - even NEW friendship - when you are building loyalty. People aren't going to be very loyal if they don't know much about you - you don't have to give your life story to people, but you also don't just advertise blindly for members without knowing what kind of people they are and what makes them "tick". In an essentially social-based game, you have to....be.....social.....and THAT is what fosters loyalty in the end. You become loyal to people you trust and even through disagreements you know you can come to a middle ground.....because you have taken the time to get to know each other.
I fear I am going to start repeating myself - I have been told I do such things lol
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  #66  
Old 10-27-2007, 07:58 PM
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The way to keep members in any group, guild or otherwise, is to get them to take ownership of it. A person who thinks of "The Adventurers of Wherever" as THEIR guild, somethng which they have invested themselves in and which they wish to see succeed is far less likely to leave. Unfortunately, there is no easy way to do this otherwise every guild would be strong and well populated. In short, it comes down to the leadership and the infrastructure. If these two elements are strong, the guild will last through thick and thin.
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  #67  
Old 10-28-2007, 04:43 PM
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One thing our guild does which seems to have been very effective in this area of "ownership" and has helped keep our guild strong and tight-knit for 2 years is the idea of "officer elections". Before creating our guild, most of us were in another guild where members felt as though leadership were making decisions that did not serve the best interests of the guild as a whole, and felt "left out", which created a lot of tension and drama. As a result, the guild disbanded. I kept in touch with everyone through my friend list, and came up with the idea of a sort of "democracy". Really, we are a guild that governs itself, and I have yet to see any other guilds with such a structure. If there *are* and it works or doesn't work, I would love to hear about it!
Every other month, the members vote on only 4 officer positions. Since I am the guild leader, I don't vote nor do I campaign for anyone, and no one is allowed to campaign to *be* an officer. They are voted on their involvement, helpfulness, knowledge, etc. Therefore, everyone can be an officer at any given election, and I have gotten so much positive feedback about how every member feels they DO have that ownership...the guild and its concept may have been an original idea of mine (somewhat....the inspiration obviously comes from history and *some* modern governments), but everyone in the guild has made it *theirs* as well. In our 2 year history, we have voted on nearly every decision together, and have had little to no "drama", and only 5 people have left.
I say all this because I am just proud of everyone in the guild, and couldn't ask for a better group of people to have fun with and go on "adventures", and get to know personally....I hope this concept may help someone trying to figure a way to "think outside the box" and maybe it will help you in defining and creating *your* guild structure....never hurts to give something new a try!
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  #68  
Old 10-28-2007, 05:56 PM
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To be honest when I look for a guild I don't look for all the cool things they accomplished I really don't give a crap what Bosses you have downed. The questions I ask are,is the leadership strong? Do I feel like I am welcomed here?,and do I enjoy hanging out and grouping with this guild? When I express my opinions will they be looked at as bitching or will my opinions be valued? I look for a guild of people who I can get along with and enjoy their company while I level up. Having leaders who do nothing but bash you in Officer chat and bash you in the Officer forums is not my idea of a friendly place to be .
I am a loyal person I will be loyal to a guild that has treated me with respect and in turn they will receive mine.


Yes, I have had bad experiences with wow guilds but I'm not giving up entirely. I have hope when AOC and Warhammer are released that I will find my place.
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  #69  
Old 10-28-2007, 10:34 PM
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i think thats a common problem in mmo's today
it is tough to find a good guild that fits ur play style but once u find it i think loyalty is a big factor within ur gaming experience guild changes shouldnt be takin lightly especially if the guild has helped u or if u r a key member
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